A
VISUAL
COMMUNICATION
COMMUNITY
WEBPAGE
the  B R I E F

What is a Brief?
A brief is simply a document that succinctly summarizes
relevant information about your communication goals.
Some agencies call it the 'creative brief'. Some call it the
'communications brief'.  Whatever it is called, it is the
most important document that starts the creative
process -
it is the foundation to the creative process. It
can mean the difference between being disorganised and
unfocused and being organised, focused and motivated.

A design brief, normally, will give sufficient information to
put the problem in context and to indicate the
requirements, but
it does not or should not impose
unnecessary constraints on the solution
.

The wording of a design brief needs careful consideration. For
example, a task can be stated in either of two ways -
   1. Design a bed
   2. Design something to sleep on
The first example is called a
closed design brief and the second
an
open design brief. A closed brief says what the product will
be. An open brief leaves it for the designer to decide.

Although a design is not generated by the brief but by the
designer's own design knowledge, the brief plays a vital role in
focusing effort towards solutions that are relevant to the client's
requirements.

A well-crafted design brief can function as a contract, an easy-to-
follow road map for the entire design process, and an invaluable
tool for securing project approval at the end of the process. A
great design brief will make life easier and less stressful for
everyone involved in a design project.



"How to brief a graphic designer"
The following information has been provided for businesses and
organisations
Information should be restricted to
- a brief description of the organisation and its communication
objectives
- whether corporate identity guidelines exist
- if and how copy and photographs will be provided
- how many design concepts will be required
- whether author’s corrections are likely to be substantial or
minimal
- production specifications
(number of pages, quantity, paper quality, size,
 preferred binding etc)
- the proposed production schedule
The above information previously appeared on the website of
Carolyn Morgan Design, Brisbane



Creative Brief see below left
A creative brief is like a road map. A good brief leads to
imaginative and persuasive ads. And gets you there quickly. A
bad brief starts you off in the wrong direction. So you have to
stop, figure out where the heck you’re going, and start again.
Go to
www.adcracker.com/brief/5-0-1.htm
see below left


EXAMPLES/ACTIVITIES

HYPOTHETICAL EVENT
Here is a design brief for a hypothetical event from Sauce, an
intiative of the Australia Council for the Arts, the Australian
Government's arts funding and advisory body.
With some modifications you may be able to use this in class
CLICK HERE


WINE LABELS
"When working with graphic designers, always give them a
written design brief as well as having a face-to-face meeting. It
is very hard to change a design to incorporate an element that
has been forgotten!"
What to include in your design brief
www.winediva.com.au/supply/graphic-design.asp



MORE INFORMATION

JOLT DESIGN is a full-service web design firm based in Mackay,
Queensland. They previously had a web page explaining the
design process they use. This included the the details sought
from the client during the briefing process.
The brief is particularly for the design of a website    
CLICK HERE  



        Click
HERE to go to UNIT 4 Outcome 1

        Click
HERE to go to DESIGN PROCESS
CREATIVE BRIEF
Client / Client contact
information:

Project:

Prepared by:

Approved by:
Client:
Agency:

Background / Overview:

What is the objective - the
purpose

What do we want to say?

What are the supporting
rational and emotional â
€˜reasons to act or believe?’

Target audience: who are we
talking to?

Additional info & insights:

What do we need from the
creative team,
and when do we need it?

Client service checklist: