A
VISUAL
COMMUNICATION
COMMUNITY
WEBPAGE
Created by
You have designed a layout for a publication and you think you
have finished

Have you really finished?

Maybe you haven't until you have undertaken what is referred
to on the following web page as
V I S U A L
P R O O F R E A D I N G

Go to
www.graphic-design.com/DTG/DTG-Solutions/visual/default.html
where you will find there are
10 Rules of Visual Proofreading

                      1. Is the layout simple?
                      2. Does the layout hold together?
                      3. Does the most important element dominate?
                      4. Is there an obvious and logical visual flow?
                      5. Are all the graphic elements visually balanced?
                      6. Is the space attractive?
                      7. Is there white space?
                      8. Do the headlines have impact?
                      9. Is there a visual storyline?
                    10. Does the whole layout feel good?

These 10 rules may not apply to every situation but they are a
good starting point.
You can also use these 'Rules' to evaluate
the effectiveness of an example of visual communication
given to you by your teacher
.


Here is another web page that will help you evaluate the
effectiveness of your layout (or another designer's layout)
Go to
www.hillsideprinting.com/seven.html
or
www.hillsideprinting.com
click on 'The Seven Deadly Sins of Desktop Publishing'
down right hand side
This web page lists
The Seven Deadly Sins of Desktop Publishing
It is  not a complete list of layout problems and, once again, will
not apply to all situations. However, avoiding them will help give
your work the professional and polished look you are after.
          1 - Too Many Fonts
           2 - Too Many Effects
           3 - Improper Margins
           4 - Misuse of Type
           5 - Not Having a Clear "Hierarchy of Importance"
           6 - Making Your Layout Too Busy - Not Having a Clear Message
           7 - Making Layout "Flow" Badly


If your evaluation shows that your layout is not as effective
as you thought it was, could it be that you did not address the
right questions at the beginning?
Click here to find  6 questions to ask before you begin designing
            1. What is the purpose of my publication?
            2. Where will readers encounter my publication?
            3. What kind of image do I want to project?
            4. What is the precise mix of text and visuals?
            5. What is the information hierarchy I want to communicate?
            6. How can I make my message as easy to read as possible?


Finally, you should read this interview with a graphic designer,
Lynda Weinman
http://webreference.com/graphics/greats/lynda/2.html
or
www.ibizinterviews.com/lyndaw1.htm (not as good)
Even though it is about designing web pages, it makes a lot of
sense in regard to other types of visual communication.