PHOTOGRAPHY
A   V I S U A L    C O M M U N I C A T I O N    C O M M U N I T Y    W E B P A G E
Created by
Methods
DRAWING

PRINTING

PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOCOPY

COMPUTER

3-D PROCESS
FOR MEMBERS ONLY
black and white

In photography, Black & White photographs are actually shades
of gray. In digital imaging these B&W images are called
grayscale to differentiate them from black and white line art.
Grayscale images store values for levels of brightness as
opposed to color information. A typical grayscale image is 256
shades of gray ranging from 0 (black) to 255 (white).

Black & White Line Art is typically 2-color (usually black and white)
clip art, pen and ink drawings, or pencil sketches. Converting a
photograph to line art may be done for special effects but with
only black or white pixels, the details of photographs are lost.
http://desktoppub.about.com/od/scanninggraphics/ss/color_to_bw.htm


colour

Colour theory is a complex subject. It contains objective laws of
psycho-optics as well as subjective value judgments. This page is
just a quick overview of a large and complex topic.
www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/colour_theory.shtml



positive

Color photography may form images as a positive transparency,
intended for use in a slide projector.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photography

The opposite of a negative (see below) is a positive (also called
"transparency," "slide" or "reversal"), which does not inverse the
colors or monochromatic shades of a scene.
click
here for more information


negative

In photography, a negative is usually photographic film coated
with chemicals that, upon photographic exposure, cause the
material to record the colors or monochromatic shades of the
scene in inverse, negative form. This process occurs inside a
camera. The resulting "negative" needs to undergo film
developing in order to be made insensitive to light. Then, it can
be used to produce a print, in which the colors or shades are
reverted to their original form.
click
here for more information

Color negatives, intended for use in creating positive color
enlargements on specially coated paper, are now the most
common form of film (non-digital) color photography, owing to
the introduction of automated photoprinting equipment.