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TECHNIQUES

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TECHNIQUE
HATCHING

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TECHNIQUE
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A C T I V I T I E S
CONTINUE - TECHNIQUE: HATCHING
1
highlight
The point closest to the light source where light is most concentrated.
Highlights are easiest to see on reflective or glossy surfaces.

2
light
Half of a hemisphere is lit when a light source is present. We see more of
the light side than we do shadow in the illustration above (refer to LIGHT
SOURCE).

3
shadow
The bottom half of the hemisphere is darker (not necessarily dark)
because it is not directly lit.

4
core shadow
This is the center of the darkened area - a thin crescent. Note that this is
even darker than the bottom edge.

5
reflected light
Use this as often as you can. It can help to define the back edge of an
object. It occurs in a shadowed area and is caused by light being reflected
from another area or created by a secondary light source.
It is used in art
rather than by graphic artists and technical illustrators.

6
cast shadow
This gives an object a nice sense of space , placing it firmly on the
'ground' -
or not
>>>>> CLICK HERE FOR INFORMATION ABOUT SHADOWS  <<<<<

Changes in planes cause these amounts of light and shadow to be
altered.

This way of shading was developed during the Renaissance and was used
by Leonardo da Vinci. In art it is referred to as 'chiaroscuro'.  This link will
take you to a drawing of a woman's head by Leonardo. If you look closely
at the chin, you can see the highlight with reflected light on the underside.
CLICK HERE