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BY
EDUCATION GRAPHICS
MARCH 2015
PERSPECTIVE
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1 POINT PERSPECTIVE
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ARCHITECTURAL ILLUSTRATION

Craig PERRY
Trained Architect now Illustrator

Craig Perry is a Melbourne based freelance illustrator. Originally trained as an architect at RMIT, he has
worked in Melbourne, London and Edinburgh. He now illustrates full time, exhibits occasionally and has a
studio in Preston, Australia. Working primarily with felt tip pens and digital colouring, his sketchy style is
ideally suited to showing imagined places.

                "My architectural background allows me to work closely with
                 Landscape Architects, Urban Designers, Architects and
                 Town Planners to quickly capture the feel of proposed
                 places and spaces."

USE THE GREAT EXAMPLES OF HIS WORK AS INSPIRATION FOR STUDENT
EXERCISES/ACTIVITIES

FIND OUT HOW HE DEVELOPED THE ONE-POINT PERSPECTIVE ILLUSTRATION BELOW
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EXTERNAL WEBSITE
CLICK link above to see the following information PLUS IMAGES

Clients brief me in meetings or emails depending on their location and the time frame for the project. They will usually send me a
plan of their design proposal sometimes including examples of planting and street furniture.

I research the existing site context using Google Streetview, Maps, satellite images and photographs of the area (especially
important if the drawing is to be an imagined aerial view).

Generally I use pencil sketches, SketchUp 3D modelling, Photoshop and scanned felt-tip pen line drawings.

The work flow for this project included the following stages.

1. Establish the viewpoint, perspective and scope of the drawing with the client using pencil sketches or simple 3D models
drawn from the site plan.

2. Develop the 3d model in SketchUp, export 2D image to Photoshop for rough modelling. Print out and pencil sketch over
to show the content. Scan and send for comment.

3. Refine 3D model per client comments. Redraw people and landscaping details in pencil over the 3D model.

4. Trace the pencil composite with felt tip pens, scan and import to Photoshop

5. Colour in Photoshop including using photos for reference (e.g. shopfronts)

6. Finish the illustration in Photoshop and issue to the client (for any final tweaks)

When the client signs off the final drawings the files are issued as high resolution A3 300 dpi CMYK for printing or A4 72dpi RGB
for screen use.
Photoshop files are around 0.4-1.2GB and the final image file is usually 10-20MB 16bit jpeg or TIFF.
I have a good A4 scanner (A3 drawings are scanned in two parts and stitched together)
I use a Wacom tablet for all digital drawing and colouring.

I separate elements by layers and will often draw all of the soft landscaping on several layers to allow for revisions to be made
to the plant types/sizes/colours.
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