CHIEF ASSESSOR'S REPORT
2009 Visual Communication and Design:
Written examination

FULL REPORT ON VCAA WEBSITE CLICK HERE    
DIRECT TO PDF DOCUMENT CLICK HERE

SUMMARY - HIGHLIGHTING MAIN POINTS
PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU READ THE FULL REPORT - SEE LINK ABOVE

GENERAL COMMENTS

Some weaknesses in the area of third-angle orthogonal drawing were evident,
as a large number of students were
unable to correctly apply the centre lines to the circles.
Refer to the resource document Technical Drawing Specifications available on the VCE Visual
Communication and Design study page on the VCAA website
CLICK HERE  

it was evident that some students
did not read the questions carefully, and therefore did not answer all
parts accordingly
.

A number of students
struggled with correct visual communication language in the written
questions, particularly when discussing media, materials and methods
.
The VCE Visual Communication and Design Study Design should be used as a guide to support the correct
visual communication terminology that is to be used in all written work.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

Question 3
For each of the two shapes rendered in Question 3 there were four marks awarded:
• one mark for applying correct and consistent use of the light source given
• three marks for correctly applying consistent tonal rendering to all surfaces of the shapes.
Most students chose to complete this question in black and white. Generally students were able
to appropriately use the light source given. However,
the rendering was often quite roughly completed and did not demonstrate high-quality,
consistent tonal shading whether it was smooth or textured.
It was clear that many students had not revised this key skill prior to the examination. Teachers should continue
to reinforce basic drawing and rendering skills in preparation for the examination.
Students should use coloured pencils when answering a rendering question.


Question 4
In Question 4, five marks each were awarded for correctly drawing each of the top, front and side views.
Six marks were awarded for correct spacing, layout, labels and symbols.
Most students were able to draw each of the views. Hidden lines were usually correctly shown
but many students were
unclear about how to correctly apply other details such as chain/centre lines, labels and
symbols.
Students are advised to refer to the document Technical Drawing Specifications on the VCE Visual
Communication and Design study page on the VCAA website to support their preparation for the examination
and complete the conventional drawing questions.
CLICK HERE  

Question 5b.
Correct answers included discussion of the most dominant elements: shape, colour, letterform, point, line and
texture.
The analysis of a design element was mostly completed well. However, when discussing
letterform many students
only referred to the text, rather than discussing the choice of letterform such as sans serif,
bold, upper/lower case, size and how the choice of letterform works in the design to express
the words visually.


Question 5c.
Correct answers included discussion of the most dominant principles: balance, contrast, hierarchy,
figure/ground, scale and pattern.
To obtain full marks for this question, students were required to evaluate effectiveness in
conveying information and/or ideas, which involved analysis of a design principle. Some
students
did not evaluate or make reference to the information or ideas conveyed and therefore did
not achieve full marks.


Question 7c.
For each method discussed, one mark was awarded for naming the method used and two marks were awarded
for the discussion of how this method was used to develop and refine ideas.
Overall, many answers to this question were weak. Student
answers lacked depth of understanding of each method and often did not employ the
terminology consistent with the VCE Visual Communication and Design Study Design.


Question 7d.
Three marks were awarded for each discussion of how Finlay Williams may have worked together with the
specialists.
Overall, students
struggled to demonstrate their understanding of the roles of the printer and the graphic
designer. Many students mistakenly discussed ‘printer’ as a piece of computer
hardware rather than a design specialist.



Question 8a.
Marks were allocated as follows:
• ten marks were awarded for the design requirements such as text, shape, colour to create hierarchy, pattern
and cropping
• six marks were awarded for the effectiveness of the design in meeting the brief.
This question required students to design a ticket for an observation wheel in the city. While
there were some high-level responses to this question,
very few responses demonstrated a considered design.

Students often did not use the entire ticket space or did not make the presentation look like
a ticket and simply decorated the space given.

It was clear that students had used the colour pencils they had available rather than
selecting the colours deliberately to create hierarchy within their design.

Additionally, very few students applied considered letterform and simply used their own
handwriting. Students are strongly encouraged to use the reference given for the type and to
select and apply letterform to suit the design.
Created and managed by
EDUCATION GRAPHICS
Information on all matters related to the administration of VCE assessment is published annually in the VCE
and VCAL Administrative Handbook and monthly in the VCAA Bulletin. Teachers must refer to these
publications for information on administrative procedures for School-assessed Coursework, the
School-assessed Task and the examination in Visual Communication and Design.
BACK
TEST/EXAM QUESTIONS
LINKS
2009 EXAM
REPORT
Added to website
JULY 2010
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.
ELEMENTS
Colour
Form
Letterform
Line
Point
Shape
Texture
Tone

PRINCIPLES
Balance
Contrast
Cropping
Figure/Ground
Hierarchy
Pattern
Proportion
Scale

METHODS
DRAWING
PRINTING
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOCOPY
COMPUTER
3-D PROCESS
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