.
OTHER
DRAWING
WEBPAGES ON THE
eDesignEd
WEBSITE

2011 BEST PAGES
CLICK HERE
includes
DRAWING
2D orthogonal/orthographic
3D pictorial perspective, isometric

ACTIVITIES
ORTHOGONAL / ORTHOGRAPHIC
Information: 6 views - complete
missing views - add dimensions -
complete isometric drawings

FROM ISO TO ORTHO

SQUARE GRID TO PRINT

* WELL WORTH A LOOK *
INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES

ACTIVITY
USING ORTHO TO SHOW 3D

2010 BEST PAGES
CLICK HERE
includes
SKETCHUP ON YOUTUBE
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING  

DRAWING DEVELOPMENT
The Five Basic Skills of Drawing:
1  THE PERCEPTION OF EDGES
2  THE PERCEPTION OF SPACES
3  THE PERCEPTION OF
   RELATIONSHIPS     
4  THE PERCEPTION OF
   LIGHT AND SHADOWS     
5  THE PERCEPTION OF THE
    WHOLE, OR GESTALT

PERSPECTIVE
Ideas for ACTIVITIES and
information about
ONE POINT PERSPECTIVE
TWO POINT PERSPECTIVE
THREE POINT PERSPECTIVE

ACTIVITY
ISOMETRIC
DESIGN AND DRAW A MAZE

ISOMETRIC
YEAR 8 MATHS ACTIVITY

EXERCISES
FROM ISOMETRIC DRAWINGS


ISOMETRIC DRAWING
CLICK HERE

ORTHOGONAL
\ ORTHOGRAPHIC
DRAWING
CLICK HERE

PERSPECTIVE
DRAWING
CLICK HERE
.
D R A W I N G    

From the REVISED STUDY DESIGN  p11

Drawings can be used for the PURPOSES of observation, visualisation and
presentation

Observational drawings
are freehand drawings from direct observation to
represent the form, materials and textures of objects/structures
GOOGLE SEARCH

Visualisation drawings are in the form of quick ideation sketches for
conceptualising and communicating ideas   
GOOGLE SEARCH

Presentation drawings are refined and finished and can be drawn using manual
and/or digital methods. Presentation drawings can incorporate technical drawing
conventions based on the
Australian Standards.  GOOGLE SEARCH

All drawings can represent objects in two- and three-dimensions
Types of two-dimensional representation drawings include orthogonal, plans and
elevations, and
packaging nets   GOOGLE SEARCH   

Types of
three-dimensional representation drawings include perspective (one and
two point) and paraline (
isometric and planometric)   GOOGLE SEARCH



VCE REVISED STUDY DESIGN
UNIT 1, OUTCOME 1
Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to create drawings for
-
different purposes
- using a range of drawing methods, media and materials.

METHODS
refer to the technical processes used to make visual communications. For this
study
drawing, painting, printing, photography, collage, three-dimensional process
and computer-based methods are appropriate.

MEDIA
are the digital and non-digital applications used to make visual communications.
Examples of digital applications include vector-based and raster-based programs.
Examples of non-digital applications include pencils, ink, markers, pastels, acrylic
paint, gouache, dye and film.

MATERIALS
are the surfaces or substrates that visual communications are applied to or
constructed from. Examples include paper, screen, card, textile, metal and plastic.
Created and managed by
EDUCATION GRAPHICS
CREATED 2 FEBRUARY 2013
UPDATED 8 FEBRUARY 2013
BACK
CURRENT NEW PAGES
INTERNET LINKS


Michael Graves is an architect and an emeritus professor at Princeton.
In an article, he wrote:
"For decades I have argued that architectural drawing can be divided into three
types, which I call the “referential sketch,� the “preparatory study�
and the “definitive drawing�.
To see examples
(note how the drawings were done as well as why they were done)
CLICK HERE  
EXTERNAL WEBSITE

Read the article by Michael Graves - 'Architecture and the Lost Art of Drawing'
CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE
+
TYPES OF DRAWING: MAKING MARKS FOR GOOD
REASONS
Includes:     UNFORTUNATELY NO EXAMPLES, BUT WORTH READING
"In thinking about drawing methodologies and their respective purposes, apparent
are at least eight distinct categories, including:
1. Life Drawing
2. Emotive Drawing
3. Sketching
4. Analytic Drawing
5. Perspective Drawing
6. Geometric Drawing
7. Diagrammatic Drawing
8. Illustration Drawing"
CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE
+
WHAT IS A DRAWING?
The term 'drawing' is applied to works that vary greatly in technique. It has been
understood in different ways at different times and is difficult to define.....
Why draw?
There are many different reasons why people draw:
to visualise thought and work something out;
to provide a pattern to follow or give instructions how to make something;
to help clients visualise what is proposed;
to describe or record something;
to give pleasure as ends in themselves.

WELL PRESENTED - from the Victoria and Albert Museum
CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE



from NEW ZEALAND     ADDED 8 FEBRUARY 2013

Amiria Robinson is a New Zealand Artist and teacher. She writes a blog targeted at
helping high school Art students gain outstanding grades. (Some information is
appropriate for Visual Communication students)

HOW TO CREATE AN EXCELLENT OBSERVATIONAL DRAWING
CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE

Also worth looking at are some of Amiria's Boards on Pinterest
CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE
IMPORTANT

The
TECHNICAL DRAWING SPECIFICATIONS RESOURCE
provided by the VCAA for the VCE Study Design has been
expanded and updated

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE PDF DOCUMENT AND ALWAYS
USE IT FROM NOW ON
NECESSARY INFORMATION FOR THE EXAMINATION

CLICK HERE
EXTERNAL WEBSITE