What is a VISUAL DIARY?

There are sketchbooks, journals, visual notebooks and visual diaries.
Are they all the same or are they all different?
The terms are often used interchangeably and there are no clear
definitions.

One person will say -
   "I believe
a sketchbook is like a diary: personal and to be
   opened only by the person whose it is, or by invitation.
   By keeping my sketchbook private I don't inhibit myself by
   worrying about what people will think about something in it,
   hold back an idea that might seem foolish if I told someone
   else, or tear out a sketch that was a disaster."
   
Marion Boddy-Evans is an artist, writer, and photographer South Africa
   CLICK HERE     External website

Another person will say -
   
Sketchbooks are as varied as the artists who keep them.
   They are a repository of ideas, perceptions, inspirational
   imagery, and graphic experiments. As personal records they
   afford an intimate glimpse of an artist's visual thinking and
   reveal aspects of their creative process.

Another will say -
   A Visual Diary is an important and essential part of the
   process of making artworks (designing).
Most artists
   (designers)  keep working diaries and they are used as an
   important part of the process of generating ideas. Working
   sketches, notes, design ideas, references and annotations in
   visual diaries should provide fascinating insights into final
   works and often, the more in-depth and extensive the
   research and planning in a journal is, the more successful
   the resulting artwork (design) will be.

In some courses, the VISUAL DIARY  or equivalent is compulsory
and is assessed. It is an essential means of recording ideas and
can be
used to describe a journey through a design and
chronicle its development
.   

Visual diaries are an individual record of students thinking about
and working on ideas they generate from their exploration of a
subject matter and their responses to the environment around
them. Students record notes, ideas, thought, associations, record
research from a range of sources, draw sketches of ideas,
storyboard, paste in development sheets, records of trips, graphic
organizers, experiment with media and ideas, layout, thumbnails,
composition and analyse their subject from different perspectives â
€“ self evaluations and reflective thinking. The purpose of visual
diaries is to encourage students to use lateral thinking or higher
level thinking skills to expand their knowledge and understanding
to enhance and expand their creative practices in an informed way.

The visual diary becomes a chronological record of their planning,
developing, clarifying and refining of ideas prior to making final
decisions about style, approach, media and interpretation of the
final product to be created and presented
. The visual diary
becomes an integral part of all planning, thinking and development
of ideas and evaluation for every student. It is the visual diary
then, that becomes a living and working document for students,
and it is expected that students annotate and make changes to
the plan as their project progresses (reflective practice).
Claire Derham-Cole
who felt there was a great need to explore activities that would capture and
promote the Maori culture as well as emphasise the use of Te Reo
CLICK HERE    External website

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