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HISTORY:
A PICTORIAL SURVEY OF HOUSING IN NEW ZEALAND
April 2009
The following information is from several issues of
'
DESIGN REVIEW' (1949-1950) made available
by the
NEW ZEALAND ELECTRONIC TEXT CENTRE


Design Review: Volume 2, Issue 3 (October-November
1949)
A Pictorial Survey of Housing in New Zealand:
Part One
By G.F.Wilson
Bishop Pompallier's house was built in 1841. It has a
simple plan and was constructed partly in wood and
partly in rammed earth. The lack of available stone or
brick in early New Zealand was no doubt the reason
why rammed earth or adobe was so extensively used at
this time .....
CLICK HERE


Design Review: Volume 2, Issue 4 (December-January
1949-50)
A Pictorial Survey of Housing in New Zealand:
Part Two
By Gordon F. Wilson
This well-proportioned cottage with a standard plan of a
central passage with rooms on either side was built
about 1870. There is a lingering trace of Regency in form
and in detail .....
CLICK HERE


Design Review: Volume 2, Issue 5 (February-March 1950)
A Pictorial Survey of Housing in New Zealand:
Part Three
By Gordon F. Wilson
This is an example in which design has ebbed to its
lowest .....
CLICK HERE


Design Review: Volume 2, Issue 6 (May-June 1950)
A Pictorial Survey of Housing in New Zealand:
Part Four
By Gordon F. Wilson
The construction of this house is of interest because it is
an attempt to retain the economy and flexibility of timber
and combine it with the durability of brick. The house is
all timber except for the 4½ in thick veneer exterior
wall .....
CLICK HERE  


Design Review: Volume 3, Issue 1 (July-August 1950)
A Pictorial Survey of Housing in New Zealand —
Conclusion
Gordon F. Wilson
As in most countries the contemporary New Zealand
house is eclectic. The overseas architectural and home
and garden magazines, which have a big influence upon
the design of the New Zealand house, not only show
the most interesting and exciting work of such
internationally known architects as Frank Lloyd Wright,
Le Corbusier and Gropius, but a great variety of work
which in most cases can only be regarded as whimsy .....
CLICK HERE   
THIS IMAGE IS FROM PART THREE
As yet I have not been able to
find similar information for
Australian/Victorian housing or
architecture. Please let me know
if you have found relevant
information.
Thanks
David