BACK to 'Bird Logo'
A    V I S U A L    C O M M U N I C A T I O N    C O M M U N I T Y    W E B P A G E
Even though the stylised logo was altered for
Paramount's 90th Anniversary (above), in February
2002, Paramount introduced a redesigned logo for the
Anniversary celebrations - a return to the more realistic
logo (above right)
For the logo (animated) to celebrate 100 years (YouTube)
click here
For more information about the history of the
PARAMOUNT logo
click here
HOW THE PARAMOUNT LOGO HAS CHANGED
In the 1930s, the logo was more realistic (left). After
WWII, it became more stylised (left below)
STYLISED IMAGES/ILLUSTRATIONS
UPDATED 11 OCTOBER 2013

NOTE: The American spelling is 'STYLIZED'

To stylise means to alter natural shapes, forms, colors, or textures in
order to make a representation in a preset style or manner

If something is stylised, it is represented with an emphasis on a
particular style, especially in a way that simplifies details rather than
trying to show naturalness or reality - it is a representation putting
greater emphasis on the method of expression than on the
appearance of nature

The style can be an artist's characteristic manner of expression - and
each artist's style can be different - or it can be  characteristic of a
particular period or group of people - such as
Art Nouveau or
X-ray aboriginal art


EXAMPLES         UPDATED 11 OCTOBER 2013

1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9




REMEMBER THAT CLICKING ON A LINK WILL USUALLY
TAKE YOU TO A PAGE ON A DIFFERENT WEBSITE
You will have to click on 'BACK' at the top of your web
browser to return to this page
YOU CAN SAVE THIS PAGE AS ONE OF YOUR 'FAVOURITES'

MORE BELOW

Artists who use stylisation use any means of pictorial simplification as long as the intention gets
across. Whereas, in realistic art/illustration (see below), the artist tries to pictorially make a true
representation of the visible object. While realistic images certainly have their place, in many
applications a stylised illustration is often more effective. The advantages are numerous.

Stylised illustrations can convey information better by omitting extraneous detail, by focusing
attention on relevant features, by clarifying and simplifying shapes, or by exposing parts that are
hidden. In addition, stylised illustrations on web pages often consume less storage than realistic
images, and are more easily reproduced and transmitted. Stylised illustrations provide a better
vehicle for conveying information at different levels of detail. Finally, in many applications,
stylised illustrations can add a sense of vitality difficult to capture with realism.


REALISM - the accurate, detailed, unembellished depiction of nature. Realism rejects imaginative
idealization in favour of a close observation of outward appearances, depicting subject matter as it
appears in actuality or ordinary visual experience without distortion or stylization.
EXAMPLES OF REALISM
 1     2     3

ANOTHER TERM YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND
ABSTRACTION
On one hand, abstract art can be considereed to be 'non-representational'. Abstract art has little or
no visual reference to objects in nature - nonrepresentational lines, colors, shapes, and forms
replace accurate visual depiction of objects, landscape, and figures. Intangible subjects such as
thoughts, emotions, and time are often expressed in abstract art form.

However, on the other hand, abstract artists may select and then exaggerate or simplify the forms
suggested by the world around them. Abstraction and abstract art can be considered to be imagery
which departs from representational accuracy to a variable range of possible degrees.  Roy
Lichtenstein made a series of images of a bull, demonstrating this kind of range in ways to approach
figuration and abstraction - beginning with the most highly figurative version, and proceeding
through stages to the most abstract version ('figurative' means representative of the real world)
www.track16.com/exhibitions/oi/lichtenstein-bull.html
The Bull Profile Series shows us a bull slowly transformed into what appears to be a Mondrian
abstraction.
The series is a wonderful explanation of how abstraction works, though we finally
realize that the apparently 'real' bull, which begins the series, is probably no more real than the
abstraction at the end.

Examples of  'abstract' logos  
UPDATED 11 OCTOBER 2013 - including PARAMOUNT info below