UNIT 1
Visual communication

OUTCOME 1
Instrumental drawing

Focus on instrumental drawing to show objects and their
relationship to each other in space - two dimensionally
and three dimensionally


ASSESSMENT TASK
A folio of instrumental drawings of objects


You will need to demonstrate the ability to:

use manual and/or electronic instruments to draw objects
using paraline drawings
- isometric
- oblique
- planometric
orthogonal (aka orthographic) drawings
- third-angle
see below

develop two-dimensional (orthogonal) views into
three-dimensional (paraline) views and vice versa (click here for
'3D to 2D' activity)

use Australian Standards conventions for dimensioning

use correct labelling and symbols in orthogonal drawings


You will need to demonstrate knowledge of

paraline drawing systems
- isometric
- oblique
- planometric

orthogonal (aka orthographic) drawing systems

manual and/or electronic equipment used to produce
paraline and orthogonal drawings

Australian Standards used in orthogonal drawing
including
- dimensioning
- labelling (letterform conventions)

drawing methods
including
- manual drawing and/or
- electronic drawing




































____________________________________


Even today when communication is so greatly improved, the
progress toward a world language is painfully slow - so slow,
indeed, that we cannot foresee the time when it will be a fact.
Although we have not been able to get together on a world
language of words and sentences, there has actually been a
universal language in use since the earliest times: the graphic
language.

To study instrumental drawing (sometimes referred to as
technical or mechanical drawing) is to learn a universal graphic
language. Pictures and views with notes and numbers are used
to communicate ideas from one person to another regardless of
the verbal language they speak. All industries that design,
construct and/or manufacture parts, products or structures use
instrumental drawings. Every product we use or consume
including our home, car, clothing, appliances, furniture, tools,
toys, computers, pencils and erasers began as an instrumental
drawing. Instrumental drawings are an intregal part of the
'Design Process' that designers, engineers and architects follow
in the creation of useful processes and products. In marketing,
instrumental drawings (technical illustrations) may be used for
multiple applications such as installation and operation manuals,
specification sheets and catalogues.

The ability to read and interpret instrumental drawings is
important in a large number of trades and professions, from
bricklaying and carpentry to engineering and architecture.
Essentially, two skills are required:
        to understand the meaning of the lines and symbols
        drawn on the page; and

        to make the mental conversion of these drawings into a
        three dimensional (3-D) reality, ie. spatial reasoning skills
Although care has been taken in preparing the information
contained on these webpages, EDUCATION GRAPHICS does not
and cannot guarantee the accuracy thereof. Teachers and
students should ALWAYS be guided by the Visual
Communication and Design VCE Study Design, and other
relevant material such as the VCAA Bulletin, published by the
Victorial Curriculum and Assessment Authority.
OUTCOME 1
OUTCOME 2
OUTCOME 3
OUTCOME 4
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